ARTICLES

ゴーン元会長逃亡事件 “極秘”捜査資料がネットに?

ゴーン元会長逃亡事件 “極秘”捜査資料がネットに?

NHK Web特集

2021/03/05

ゴーン元会長逃亡事件に関する極秘捜査資料を裁判記録の一部としてネット上で簡単に閲覧することができる米国と、依然として裁判記録へのアクセスのハードルが高く、公開が進まない日本について比較検証しています。

裁判公開や知る権利について、日米専門家とともに法廷メモ裁判の原告としてのインタビューが掲載されています。

BOOK REVIEW:  Saul J. Takahashi (ed.), “Civil and Political Rights in Japan” (Routledge, 2019)

BOOK REVIEW:  Saul J. Takahashi (ed.), “Civil and Political Rights in Japan” (Routledge, 2019)

NUMBER1 Shinbun FCCJ (Foreign Corresponding Club of Japan)

2021/01/04

Introducing a fine collection of articles on important human rights issues by highly qualified authors.

The Reality of the “Right to Counsel” in Japan and the Lawyers’ Campaign to Change It

The Reality of the “Right to Counsel” in Japan and the Lawyers’ Campaign to Change It

The Asia-Pacific Journal / Japan Focus, Vol. 18, Issue. 13, No. 4

2020/07/02

Makoto Ibusuki and Lawrence Repeta

This article describes the evolution in access to legal counsel during the pretrial interrogation stage, the recent decline in pretrial detentions, and the campaign for the regulation of interrogations by Japan’s bar associations.  Available evidence suggests this decline is primarily the result of the proactive stance of defense attorneys who challenge court detention orders more frequently and of judges who are more willing to recognize those challenges and release suspects from detention.

No need for "constitutional emergency power" -- Diet action serves the "public welfare"

No need for "constitutional emergency power" -- Diet action serves the "public welfare"

The Asahi Shimbun

2020/06/02

Some people suggest that Japan’s Constitution must be revised in order to grant the Cabinet special authority to address the coronavirus emergency.  But there is no need for such a change to the Constitution.  This article introduces a court judgment from the United States regarding lockdown orders.

The coronavirus and Japan’s Constitution

The coronavirus and Japan’s Constitution

Japan Times

2020/04/14

Article 41provides the government with sufficient power to take aggressive action

SEATTLE – Many foreign observers are puzzled by Japan’s odd response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which some call a “soft lockdown.” After dithering for weeks, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe finally exercised power granted under the recently revised New Influenza Special Measures Act to declare a state of emergency on April 7 over Tokyo and six other prefectures, authorizing prefectural governors to request social-distancing measures and other actions.

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